Remember the Alamo this Memorial Day

One of the most gallant stands of courage and undying self-sacrifice which have come down through the pages of history is the defense of the Alamo, which is one of the priceless heritages of Texans and of all Americans. It was the battle-cry of “Remember the Alamo” that later spurred on the forces of Sam Houston at San Jacinto. Anyone who has ever heard of the brave fight of Colonel Travis and his men is sure to “Remember the Alamo.” Continue reading

Marcus Tullius Cicero

Cicero was the greatest speaker among the many famous statesmen of ancient Rome. He practiced law and studied philospohy in Greece before holding a rising sequence of important jobs in the Roman Empire. In 64 BCE he became Consul, the highest office in Rome. As Consul he won fame for his orations against Cataline, the head of a secret conspiracy to seize the government. Always a staunch supporter of the Republic, Cicero was eventually forced from office by his enemies, and when Julius Caesar consolidated his power in 48 BC, Cicero went into political retirement. During this time he wrote his famous essays on happiness, on old age, and on friendship. Upon Caesar’s assassination in 44 BCE, Cicero returned to public life and delivered a series of scathing speeches (the “Phillipics”) against Marc Antony. This proved to be Cicero’s undoing: when Antony took power in a triumvirate with Octavian and Marcus Lepidus, Cicero was declared an outlaw and killed by Antony’s men in 43 BCE. Continue reading

Ligabue

The Italian Bruce Springsteen, that’s how many critics have described Ligabue and his music — not only for his sound, strongly influenced by U.S. classic rock, nor for his lyrics about love, rock & roll, and dreams of escape (with Italy’s Via Emilia in place of Route 66), and not even for his look. No, such a comparison is mainly due to the impact that Ligabue has on his wide audience and to the way in which his fans strongly identify with his songs. Authenticity, sweat, and electric guitars: these are the ingredients of a recipe that, with very small changes during the years, have made him one of the most successful Italian rockers of the last two decades, second only to Vasco Rossi. Continue reading

Lucius Junius Brutus

Lucius Junius Brutus (LVCIVS IVNIVS BRVTVS) was the founder of the Roman Republic and traditionally one of the first consuls in 509 BC. He was claimed as an ancestor of the Roman gens Junia, including Marcus Junius Brutus, the most famous of Caesar’s assassins. Brutus was a hero of Republicanism during the Enlightenment and Neoclassical periods, and artists like Jacques-Louis David painted scenes of his life. Continue reading

Jacques-Louis David

Image-maker to Napoleon. Political exile. Jacques-Louis David was the most famous—and controversial—artist of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Jacques-Louis David (1748–1825) was the most famous painter in Europe in the late 1700s and early 1800s. He breathed new life into history painting with his rigorously constructed compositions, which distilled complex stories to their essential elements. His spare, taut style influenced countless other artists in France and abroad. Passionately committed to artistic freedom and innovation, David experimented constantly with style and subject matter. Continue reading

Indochine

Indochine is a French new wave/rock band, formed in 1981. The band was very successful in France in the 1980s, as well as other parts of continental Europe and Latin America, with songs like L’Aventurier and Canary Bay. Following the release of several critically acclaimed, but commercially unsuccessful, albums in the 1990s, the group returned to stardom with the release of Paradize in 2002. The band have sold over 10 million albums and singles, making them the best selling French band. Continue reading